Communal roosting of the Jamaican Crow (<em>Corvus jamaicensis</em>)

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Gary R. Graves

Abstact: Communal roosting is reported for the first time in the Jamaican Crow (Corvus jamaicensis). Crows roosted in an isolated cluster of tall trees (Albizia falcataria) that emerged from an area of mixed agriculture at the northern edge of Cockpit Country, Trelawny Parish, Jamaica. Evening roost counts, 21-23 February 2008, varied from 53 to 64 crows. Crows arrived at the roost after sunset in near darkness (1826-1841) and departed before sunrise (0600-0622). Crows roosted on thin branches high in the canopy, possibly as a defense against the nocturnal Jamaican boa (Epicrates subflavus).


Keywords: Cockpit Country, communal roost, Corvus jamaicensis, Epicrates subflavus, Jamaica, Jamaican boa, Jamaican Crow, Trelawny Parish


Resumen: Dormitorios comunales del Cuervo de Jamaica (Corvus jamaicensis)- Dormtorios comunales se reportan por primera vez en el Cuervo de Jamaica (Corvus jamaicensis). Los cuervos dormían en un grupo aislado de árboles altos (Albizia falcataria) que emergían sobre un área de agricultura mixta en el borde norte de Cockpit Country, Trelawny Parish, Jamaica. Conteos vespertinos en el dormitorio, el 21-23 de febrero de 2008, variaron desde 53 hasta 64 cuervos. Los cuervos llegan al sitio después de la puesta del sol, casi en la oscuridad (1826-1841) y se marchan antes del amanecer (0600-0622). Los cuervos dormían en ramas finas, altas en el dosel, posiblemente como una defensa contra la boa nocturna de Jamaica (Epicrates subflavus).


Palabras clave: Cockpit Country, Cuervo de Jamaica, Corvus jamaicensis, Jamaica, sitios de descanso comunales, Trelawny Parish


Résumé: Regroupement en dortoir chez la Corneille de la Jamaïque (Corvus jamaicensis)- Un regroupement en dortoir est signalé pour la première fois chez la Corneille de la Jamaïque (Corvus jamaicensis). Les oiseaux se sont regroupés dans un bosquet de grands arbres (Albizia falcataria) qui émerge d’une zone agricole à l’extrémité nord de Cockpit Country, Trelawny Parish, en Jamaïque. Des comptages en soirée, du 21 au 23 février 2008, recensaient de 53 à 64 individus. Les corneilles sont arrivées au dortoir après le coucher du soleil, dans l’obscurité presque complète (1826-1841) et reparties avant le lever du soleil (0600-0622). Elles étaient perchées sur de fines branches à la cime des arbres, peut-être afin de se défendre contre le Boa de la Jamaïque (Epicrates subflavus), prédateur nocturne.


Mots clés: Boa de la Jamaïque, Cockpit Country, Corneille jamaïcaine, Corvus jamaicensis, dortoir, Epicrates subflavus, Jamaïque, Trelawny Parish

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