Dispersal and genetic variation in an endemic island woodpecker, the Guadeloupe Woodpecker (<em>Melanerpes herminieri</em>)

Main Article Content

David P. Arsenault
Pascal Villard
Mary M. Peacock
Stephen St. Jeor

Abstract: We used mark-resight and DNA fingerprinting to investigate dispersal and genetic variation in the Guadeloupe Woodpecker (Melanerpes herminieri). This species is endemic to Guadeloupe, where the entire population is found on two islands: Basse-Terre and Grande-Terre. The Grande-Terre population is approximately one quarter of the total Guadeloupe Woodpecker population and the loss and fragmentation of forest on the island has resulted in some isolation from the larger Basse-Terre population. Our results suggest that dispersal and gene flow occurred between the populations, but dispersal was limited and there was a moderate degree of genetic differentiation. The Grande-Terre population had significantly higher band sharing among adults than Basse-Terre, suggesting that dispersal from Grande-Terre to Basse-Terre may be more frequent than vice versa. Band sharing between mated pairs on Grande-Terre was significantly higher than band sharing between randomized pairings of males and females, suggesting that mating was not random. Some breeding occurred between first order relatives within both island populations and one case of extra-pair fertilization was detected. Continued habitat loss and fragmentation on Grande-Terre will further reduce the total population size and may have profound effects on population persistence and the maintenance of genetic variation in the Guadeloupe Woodpecker.


Keywords: dispersal, DNA fingerprinting, extra-pair fertilization, Guadeloupe Woodpecker, habitat loss, markresight, Melanerpes herminieri, population genetics


Resumen: Dispersión y variación genética en el carpintero endémico de una isla, el carpintero de Guadalupe (Melanerpes herminieri)- Usamos las técnicas de marcaje-reavistamiento y DNA fingerprinting para investigar la dispersión y la variación genética del Carpintero de Guadalupe (Melanerpes herminieri). Esta especie es endémica de Guadalupe, donde toda la población se encuentra en dos islas: Basse-Terre y Grande-Terre. La población de Grande-Terre es aproximadamente un cuarto del total de la población de la especie; la pérdida y fragmentación de los bosques de la isla ha resultado en su aislamiento de la población de mayor tamaño de Basse-Terre. Nuestros resultados sugieren que hay dispersión y flujo génico entre las poblaciones, pero la dispersión fue limitada y existió un grado moderado de diferenciación genética. En la población de Grande-Terre se obtuvieron bandas significativamente más anchas compartidas entre adultos que en la población de Basse-Terre; esto sugiere que la dispersión de Grande-Terre a Basse-Terre puede ser más frecuente que viceversa. El número de bandas compartidas entre individuos formando parejas en Grande-Terre fue significativamente mayor que entre parejas aleatorias de machos y hembras; lo que sugiere que la formación de parejas no es aleatoria. Se detectaron indicios de reproducción entre parientes de primer orden dentro de las poblaciones de cada isla y un caso de fertilización extramarital. La pérdida continua de hábitat y la fragmentación de Grande-Terre reducirá el tamaño poblacional total y puede tener profundos efectos en la persistencia poblacional y mantenimiento de la variación genética en el Carpintero de Guadalupe.


Palabras clave: dispersión, DNA fingerprinting, fertilización extramarital, Carpintero de Guadelupe, pérdida de hábitat, marcaje-reavistamiento, Melanerpes herminieri, genética poblacional.


Résumé: Dispersion et variation génétique chez une espece de pic endémique et insulaire, le Pic de la Guadeloupe (Melanerpes herminieri)- Nous avons utilisé le baguage-contrôle et l’ADN (technique de fingerprinting) pour connaître la dispersion des individus et la variation génétique chez le Pic de la Guadeloupe (Melanerpes herminieri). Cette espèce est endémique de la Guadeloupe où la population est trouvée sur deux îles: Basse-Terre et Grande-Terre. La population de la Grande-Terre représente environ un quart de la population totale avec un certain degré d’isolement par rapport à la plus vaste population de la Basse-Terre, du à la réduction et à la fragmentation de son habitat. Nos résultats suggèrent que la dispersion des pics et donc les flux de gènes ont lieu entre les populations, mais la dispersion reste limitée avec un degré modéré de différenciation génétique. La population de la Grande-Terre avait une proportion de bandes communes considérablement plus élevé que celle de la Basse-Terre, suggérant que la dispersion de Grande-Terre vers Basse-Terre doit être plus fréquente que l’inverse. Le partage de bandes entre paires appariés sur Grande-Terre était considérablement plus élevé que celui prévu lors d’appariements au hasard, ce qui suggère que les accouplements n’étaient pas réalisés de façon aléatoire. Quelques reproductions ont eu lieu entre proches parents au sein de chacune des deux populations et nous avons aussi trouvé un cas de féconda-fragmentation sur Grande-Terre réduiront en outre la dimension de la population totale et peuvent avoir des effets profonds sur persistance de la population et l'entretien de variation génétique dans le Pivert de Guadeloupe.


Mots clés: ADN fingerprinting, dispersion, fécondation extra couple, génétique de population, marquage contrôle, Melanerpes herminieri, perte d’habitat, Pic de la Guadeloupe

Abstract 523 | PDF Downloads 485

References

ARSENAULT, D. P., P. B. STACEY, AND G. A. HOELZER.
2005. Mark-recapture and DNA fingerprinting
data reveal high breeding site fidelity, low
natal philopatry, and low levels of genetic population
differentiation in Flammulated Owls. Auk
122:329-337.

BROOK, B. W., AND J. KIKKAWA. 1998. Examining
threats faced by island birds: a population viability
analysis on the Capricorn Silvereye using
long-term data. Journal of Applied Ecology 35:
491-503.

COURCHAMP, F., M. LANGLAIS, AND G. SUGIHARA.
1999. Control of rabbits to protect island birds
from cat predation. Biological Conservation 89:
219-225.

DICKINSON, J., J. HAYDOCK, W. KOENIG, M. STANBACK,
AND F. PITELKA. 1995. Genetic monogamy
in single-male groups of acorn woodpeckers,
Melanerpes formicivorus. Molecular Ecology 4:
765-769.

DICKINSON, J. L., AND J. J. AKRE. 1998. Extrapair
paternity, inclusive fitness, and within-group
benefits of helping in western bluebirds. Molecular
Ecology 7:95-105.

FLEISCHER, R. C., C. L. TARR, AND T. K. PRATT.
1994. Genetic structure and mating system in the
Palila, an endangered Hawaiian Honeycreeper, as
assessed by DNA fingerprinting. Molecular Ecology
3:383-392.

FRANKHAM, R. 1998. Inbreeding and extinction:
island populations. Conservation Biology 12:665-
675.

GILBERT, D. A., N. LEHMAN, S. J. O'BRIEN, AND R.
K. WAYNE. 1990. Genetic fingerprinting reflects
population differentiation in the California Channel
Island fox. Nature 344:764-766.

GILPIN, M. E. 1991. The genetic effective population
size of a metapopulation. Pp. 165-175 in
Metapopulation dynamics: Empirical and theoretical
investigations (M. E. Gilpin, and I. Hanski,
eds.). Academic Press, San Diego.

HAYDOCK, J., W. D. KOENIG, AND M. T. STANBACK.
2001. Shared parentage and incest avoidance
in the cooperatively breeding acorn woodpecker.
Molecular Ecology 10:1515-1525.

JEFFREYS, A. J., N. J. ROYLE, V. WILSON, AND Z.
WONG. 1988. Spontaneous mutation rates to new
length alleles at tandem-repetitive hypervariable
loci in human DNA. Nature 332:278-281.

JEFFREYS, A. J., V. WILSON, AND S. L. THEIN.
1985. Hypervariable ‘minisatellite’ regions in
human DNA. Nature 314:67-73.

LYNCH, M. 1991. Analysis of population genetic
structure by DNA fingerprinting. Pp. 113-126 in
DNA fingerprinting approaches and applications
(G. D. T. Burke, A. J. Jeffreys, and R. Wolff,
eds.). Birkhauser Verlag Basel, Switzerland.

NAKA, L. N., M. RODRIGUES, A. L. ROOS, AND M.
A. G. AZEVEDO. 2002. Bird conservation on
Santa Catarina Island, southern Brazil. Bird Conservation
International 12:123-150.

NEI, M., T. MARUYAMA, AND R. CHAKRABORTY.
1975. The bottleneck effect and genetic variability
in populations. Evolution 29:1-10.

PEACOCK, M. M. 1997. Determining natal dispersal
patterns in a population of North American Pikas
(Ochotonas princeps) using direct mark-resight
and indirect genetic methods. Behavioral Ecology
8:340-350.

PEREIRA, S. L., AND A. WAJNTAL. 2001. Estimates
of the genetic variability in a natural population
of Bare-faced Curassow Crax fasciolata. Bird
Conservation International 11:301-308.

PIPER, W. H., AND P. P. RABENOLD. 1992. Use of
fragment-sharing estimates from DNA fingerprinting
to determine relatedness in a tropical
wren. Molecular Ecology 1:69-78.

RAVE, E. H. 1995. Genetic analyses of wild populations
of Hawaiian Geese using DNA fingerprinting.
Condor 97:82-90.

RILEY, J. 2002. Population sizes and the status of
endemic and restricted-range bird species on
Sangihe Island, Indonesia. Bird Conservation
International 12:53-78.

SEKERCIOGLU, Ç. H., G. C. DAILY, AND P. R. EHRLICH.
2004. Ecosystem consequences of bird declines.
Proceedings of the National Academy of
Science 101:18042-18047.

SOULÉ, M. E., AND K. A. KOHN. 1989. Research
priorities for conservation biology. Washington,
DC.

VILLARD, P. 1999. The Guadeloupe Woodpecker
and other island Melanerpes. Société d’Etudes
Ornithologiques de France (SEOF), Brunoy.

VILLARD, P., AND A. ROUSTEAU. 1998. Habitats,
density, population size, and the future of the
Guadeloupe Woodpecker. Ornitologia Neotropical
9:1-8.

WINKLER, H., D. A. CHRISTIE, AND D. NURNEY.
1995. Woodpeckers: A guide to the woodpeckers
of the World. Houghton Mifflin, New York.
WRIGHT, S. 1969. Evolution and the genetics of
populations. University of Chicago Press, Chicago